Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Palmolive Divine Blends Review and Giveaway: Washing Dishes Never Smelled SO Good!



The Mummy Hearts Money household was sent a big bottle of the Palmolive Divine Blends to trial this month. Thanks to a small accident, my first experience with the Palmolive Divine Blends involved a broken bottle and a counter top covered in detergent. My kitchen has never smelt so pretty before, and I couldn't wait to get some of this stuff into a sink full of dishes.

How Did It Perform?

I'm not a fan of a sink full of bubbles, so I put my detergent in after the water and swish it around. Palmolive detergents are nice and thick, so only the smallest dob is needed in a full sink to clean dishes. We washed a pretty disgusting and greasy pan that had been used for sausages in the sink, and had no issue with residue afterwards.

While there was no soap scum on any glassware that we washed, we find we need to use this detergent sparingly if we don't want it to need excess rinsing after wash. Which is actually a good thing as the less detergent that needs to be used per wash, the longer it lasts! I'm fairly picky with the clarity of the water when I am washing up as well, if it starts to look cloudy at all I tend to start a new sink pretty quickly, and I did find that I only refreshed my water once per full counter of dishes instead of 3-4 times which is the norm for me when using cheaper detergents.

This would probably be the most aromatic detergent I've ever used, with my my sink, my dishes, and my whole kitchen wafting the fragrance of Vanilla and Berries for some time after each wash, especially when the water is hot.

How Much and Where?

The large 700ml bottle of Palmolive Divine Blends Vanilla and Berries variety that we tried retails for $4.99 at leading retailers. I've spotted it on sale already in the last month at Woolworth's for 20% off, and I wouldn't be surprised to see another in the near future. The 375ml Violet and Apple Blossoms variety retails for $3.49.

Whats In For You?

You know I always try to wrangle a product for my readers as well! This month is no exception with not one but THREE bottles of the delicious smelling Palmolive Vanilla and Berries Divine Blends up for grabs. There are three EASY ways to enter, and you can enter all three ways as long as you use a unique photo each time.

Share a photo of the dishes that you would love to wash with Palmolive Divine Blends.

1. On Facebook, tagging Mummy Hearts Money and using #MHMPalmoliveGiveaway
2. On Twitter, tagging @MummyHearts and using #MHMPalmoliveGiveaway
3. On Instagram, tagging @MummyHearts and using #MHMPalmoliveGiveaway

You can share the photo on your own Facebook page or mine, I don't care! I've shown you mine, now I just want to see your dirty dishes!

Terms and Conditions

1. Prize will only be shipped to an Australian address
2. There will only be one (1) winner
3. The prize is three (3) bottles of Palmolive Vanilla and Berries Divine Blends
4. Prize will be mailed out by the promoter, and Mummy Hearts Money bears no responsibility for prizes lost or damaged in transport
5. Winner will be contacted/tagged by the social media channel of the winning photo and will need to reply within 7 days or a new winner will be drawn.
6. Winner will also be announced on Facebook
7. Entries will be collated and winner will be chosen by random draw.
8. This promotion is in no way endorsed by Facebook
9. All entries must be received by 5th of May
10. Winner will be drawn within 48 hours
11. Mummy Hearts Money reserves the right to repost or promote picture entered into the competition in any way that supports the promotion (with credit).

I have received complimentary products to facilitate this review. However Digital Parents Collective covered the administration fee to host the giveaway. As always, all opinions expressed are purely my own.

Easter Show on a Budget

Excluding tickets, the total cost of the above was $1.50
Our family loves the Easter Show. The food, the rides, the show bags, animals, wood chopping, grand parade...there isn't much to not love. The days are long gone when I could allow $800-$1000 to spend though. Three children + a mortgage later our budget is much lower.

Keeping it Real: How much did the day cost?

Tickets: $78 (x2 adults, + 1 child with toddlers free all purchased at a discount through my social club)
Food: $3
Showbags: $65
Teenager: $20
Rides: $20
Misc: $7.50
Total: $193.50

Just think, if I'd won tickets the day would have been even cheaper! Definitely motivation to keep entering those comps each year.

We packed food and drinks for the day, taking in some soft drinks, water, and snacks. I don't even make a pretence at healthy eating when we go to something like the Show, with all that delicious food everywhere you turn, a salad sandwich is not going to rock my kids worlds. Instead it was fairy bread cut into star shapes, which they think is terrific because it's our treat food.
Meeting a farmer, these guys are lovely and so friendly!
I love to talk to the growers, admire their beautiful stands and I always buy something. This year was no exception, and I gave Lorelei $1 to buy 3 banana's to share with her brother and cousin. Bargain afternoon tea and we enjoyed a chat with the growers about their displays and produce.

The other $2 in food was spent buying crumpets smothered in Nutella and honey. Yeah yeah, I could buy a whole pack for $1.50 on sale, but it's the show, they smell delicious, and as expenses go they are a pretty cheap treat.

There is so much to do at the Show, even if I wanted to run out of free entertainment I couldn't. Some of the highlights for me this year were:

Silent disco. I realise we looked like complete dorks grooving to our own beat with our headphones on and no apparent sound to anyone else, but when Gangnam Style comes on you don't ask questions, you get on that pony and ride.
Getting my kids fingerprinted and tattooed at the police stand. The irony.
Kicking back in the inflatable dome to watch a surround vision movie from the comfort of a beanbag. Yes, there was a couple at the back sleeping peacefully. No, it was not Husband and I, although we took a moment to consider the possibilities.
Baby animal nursery. Thanks to the rain and the later time (6:30pm) this was almost deserted and we walked straight into enjoy all the animals to ourselves. Seb was more than a little intimidated by some of the animals and hid in the corner till the goats stopped chasing him, but he loved the puppies.

We barely walked 3 or 4 stands in the pavilions without bumping into something fun for kids. It made it so easy to wander and browse because the toddlers in our group didn't get time to be bored. Colouring in/sucking communal crayons at the Crayola stand, playing with blocks at BUPA, pumpkins to kiss or food to sample.

Have you been or are you going? What's your favourite part of the show this year? I give you the mission of keeping it under $200 for the visit :)



Monday, April 14, 2014

9 Tips for Managing Health Insurance Premium Pain


We came to our health insurance later in life than we should have. Husband was 36, so we are stuck with an extra 10% age loading on our premium till 2022.

I didn't see the point of health insurance if you didn't earn over the amount where the additional Medicare Levi applies (currently $160,000+ for families). We were so far off that amount (still are) that it seemed like an unnecessary expense in a country where you can see a doctor and have basic medical needs met at no or little cost. 

It wasn't until I found out during my 2012 pregnancy that my child might have medical problems (he doesn't) that I took out insurance. If Seb was going to need extra help I wanted to make sure he would be covered from birth and as it turns out he was fine. But I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease only a few months after his birth, and with all my hospitalisations in the last 18 months suddenly I am seeing the point of private health insurance! I shudder to think of the waiting lists and expense I would have incurred for all my expensive medicines, specialists, and hospital stays without my insurance.

In the short time frame we have had our policy we have had increase letter after increase letter hit our inbox. Yet another one arrive just the other day! My premium will be going up from $208.98 per month to $231.54, or almost 11%. My original premium, back mid 2012 was $192.68. In the space of less than 2 years my premium has increased by 20%. That's enormous! 

What can we do to make our Health insurance work as hard as the premiums?

  • Check for policy discounts. Ask your employers, superannuation, and other insurances for Health Insurance offers. You might qualify for a discount or at the very least an upgrade. Check also with family as their corporate cover might extend to family members.
  • Shop around regularly for those joining offers, there may be discounts or freebies for changing. Just make sure premiums and limits are in your favour.
  • Think differently. Husband has the slightest possible prescription and doesn't need glasses for general wear so we use his optical budget for sunglasses each year.
  • Use them up. If your script doesn't change and your glasses are in good condition consider on selling your new frames once it becomes apparent you don't need them. I've sold spare frames for $60 each.
  • Manage Exclusions. Check your policy for possible exclusions that could save you money. Think hard about them though, you never know when a medical tragedy can hit and you may wish you had hip replacement after all!
  • Review your excess. Consider adjusting your hospital excess if there are any benefits. We took advantage of a promotion to decrease our excess slightly that includes 2 free hospital admissions per year per person. Definately worth it when I consider that I seem to be admitted 2-3 times per year.
  • Preventative Health Options. It's possible that weight loss, cigarette quitting, gym memberships and other preventative life quality options might be included in your policy. Talk to your doctor to see if there is anything you may be able to adopt to improve your health.
  • Be creative with your payment options for expensive medical services. Madeleine's orthodontic work was meant to be paid for over 20 months but we were able to negotiate for slightly smaller payments over 20 months with a small lump sum 3 months later in January. The timing of our payments mean that I will be able to make a claim for the last of Maddy's orthodontic cover in a 3rd calendar year and get more back for her braces.
  • Use them or lose them! Make sure you are taking kids of all ages to the dentist and optomestrist regularly for checkups. Many benefits do not roll over from year to year so if you do not make the time for a visit this year the opportunity is lost.
Do you have any other hot tips to make the most of health insurance?

Thursday, April 10, 2014

I NEED an iPhone Mum


I NEED an iPhone. This is something I hear all the time from Madeleine. Along with:

My phone is crap. I can't use it, it doesn't do anything, I can't believe you expect me to use a phone like this.

And

ALL my friends have an iPhone.

This is not a debate on when a child is old enough to have a phone. I don't believe there is a precise age, it depends on your circumstances and the situations your child finds themselves in. Madeleine is often with other adults, and often at dancing without a parent for many hours of the day or evening.

She got her first phone when she was 8, long before I expected to give her one. I received a call at work one day from a random stanger who had found her crying in the lobby of her Grandmothers secure unit building. Her father had dropped her off and watched her walk in the main secure door (who on earth let her in?), but her Grandmother forgot she was coming and didn't wake up or hear the door. Forget how angry I was at the circumstances that led to it (why, WHY did my husband not walk her to her Grandmothers door, why, WHY, did her Grandmother not wake up when she was expecting her), my main stress was that Maddy had to trust a stranger and enter their home in the middle of her distress. She was able to tell them where I worked, and they called the main call centre and tracked me down. Oh. My. God. So yes. If she was old enough to be put in that situation, then she was old enough for a phone to give her (and me) some reassurance that she could aways gets hold of a parent.

Back to the iPhone and 5 years later.

Maddy has a cheap Nokia that we purchased for $20 with a prepaid Optus Sim. Due to her low call volumes we find that the $30 long expiry plan is best for us, as she doesn't even use up the $30 credit in the 6 month expiry window. It works out to be $5 per month which is fine by me. I am also with Optus, so our calls to one another are free which helps with the credit.

Every now and then, after months of being nagged, begged, slightly abused, she starts to wear me down. We have a spare iPhone, relatives have scores of spare iPhones (just because we care for them well and get upgrades every couple of years), and it would make her so happy. Right when I am on the brink of giving in, despite knowing better, something will happen to remind why I am not giving my 13 year old this expensive technology.

2 months ago she broke her iPad screen. Completely shattered. She is still paying off the consequences. Last week a girlfriends daughter shattered the new iPhone 5 she had been given (holy moly, I was only considering giving Maddy an iPhone 3, or at best a 4 if a relo wants to donate one to the cause), another friend reports x3 months of $300+ bills in a row.

Oh that's right. Those are the reasons why she is not getting this unnecessary tech. To her it is a toy. The reason she rarely uses her current phone is because she actually doesn't want to make phone calls. She wants to play games, use social media, take photo's, edit photo's, and flash it around as a status symbol. All things she can do with her school iPad on the connected wifi. (when I haven't deleted all her non-school apps, but that is another story). It isn't just the iPhone she is desperately wanting, it is the 3G technology, something I won't be getting for only $5 per month.

So I am writing this post as a reminder to myself. She is 13. It is natural that she will make every promise and commitment under the sun to get her hands on that iPhone. It is equally natural that she will make expensive mistakes at my expense once she has it. It is natural that I want to give her something that will make her happy. But my wallet can't afford it, and she is a very normal teenager who will run up huge bills and then resent the consequences.

This is a lesson that can wait till she has her first part time job and has to consider the size of her bill against the size of her income. And if she chooses to not use her current phone to demonstrate her contempt that is it just a phone and nothing more, deep down, I will cheer. $5 a month is awesome. Keep the faith, Elise, keep the faith.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Grocery Shopping Mummy Hearts Money Style

My grocery budget is $260 per fortnight. With that money I am feeding a 5 person family, including 1 baby in full time nappies, and a toddler in night time nappies. I know many families the same size or smaller spending much, much, more, but I also know of families doing an even better job with their budget than me. I don't have the luxury of time on my hands to shop at smaller greengrocers, deli's, and butchers anymore, so almost 100% of my shop is done at one of the majors, who are conveniently open at 10pm. I do a handful of smaller shops throughout the fortnight to top up on Milk, sandwich meat, and fruit, all included in my initial budget. It's a fairly flat budget, as if I am way under for the fortnight, I will use the spare money to stock up on oher essentials like toiletries, cleaning products, tinned products, and hygiene products. It's pretty rare we run out of those things.

Here are my top tips for working the shopping trolley:

Shop alone, or with the most helpful person in your house. I NEVER shop with Husband, who gets to the shops so rarely that new products always catch his eye and make it into the basket. Instead I take Madeleine, who is old enough to nip between the aisles in search of items for me.

Discard all Brand loyalty. If it isn't delivering the most cost efficient, quality output, it's not the right brand. There will be a different promotion every week, and your allegiance needs to shift to the lowest unit price. Know what doesn't suit your family though, and don't buy it again regardless of price.

When it's awesome, buy 10. Anytime a product I enjoy is half price, I will stock up with 10 of them (provided they are a essential consumable, and not a luxury item). I love my Moccona coffee, but always make do with cheaper stuff until Moccona goes on sale again and I can stock up.


Ask for a Rain Check. If that awesome sale item has an empty shelf, ask for a rain check at the service desk. Sometimes I go back on the last day of the catalogue because I know the shelf will be empty and I can get a rain check. This is great if it's something outside my budget today that I will want in a month. This is an especially awesome trick when it's bulk nappies on sale. Laundry detergent or dish washing tablets is another good one that can kill a shopping budget if I wasn't planning for it, but the rain check gives me time to factor it into the budget.


Generics Rock. Tried something 2 years ago and thought it sucked? It probably did. Try it again anyway. Never say no indefinitely to a generic for anything, they are always improving the products. Hygiene products, tinned foods, frozen foods, there are some gems everywhere, and in many cases the generic is my favourite option (Woolies cheese, or Aldi's nuggets anyone?). My cart tends to be 50/50 these days, as the brand labels are often cheaper thanks to sales and promotions. And don't kid youself, alot of the time the same product is repackaged for another company. Check out the 2 tins of tomato's top right. Look familiar?


Shop in the clearance sections. We know where the half metre clearance shelf is in the fridge section, bakery, as well as the location of the clearance trolley. These babies are goldmines! Dairy with only a few days left, beauty! Potato Bake tonight! Pizza bases running out of time, tonight's dinner is served. I often grab pantyhose with ripped packaging, or cleaning and bathroom products with damaged boxes at less than half the original price.

It's all in the list. Write a meal plan using the items already in your cupboards, then follow through with meals based on items on special, then make it up after that. Once you have a locked down meal plan, you can make a list of missing items. Try to stock up on specials and use them heavily in meals over the coming weeks.

Give yourself an impulse budget. Impulse purchases are what drag everyone down and I'm no exception. It's the clearance items that get me, so I have a $20 allowance that I can spend on specials or clearance items. Once that $20 has run out, then the items have to wait for another shop. The clearance items end up saving us money in the short and long term, but I never go overboard buying more than we need thanks to the $20 fail safe.


Check your prices. If you nailed down your shopping list and kept track as you shopped, you should be pretty on top by the time you get to the register. Check prices at the scanner or on the receipt before you leave the store. Have any discrepancies fixed up immediately, as it's unlikely you'll want to come back. I tend to find at LEAST 1 mistake per shop, particularly on sale items. If in doubt, take photo's. I get stalked by curious security and workers as a result of my photography sessions, but I do it anyway.

Watch your unit prices. They are often wrong, and you may make the incorrect purchasing decision. If not wrong, they may have employed inconsistent pricing methods, such as a per tablet unit for one brand of dish washing tablet, vs a grams unit price for another.

No shame. There is no shame in asking for a discount for damaged stock. Look them in the eye and wait out the incredulous silence. Trust me, they will break first. Just remember that no shame rule when they are staring you down for a $0.50 refund or rain check.

What's your top tip for saving money at the cash register?

Sunday, April 6, 2014

An Awkward Customer Service Experiance


When I finished my usual fortnightly grocery shop last night, I paused outside Woolies to check my reciept. I almost always find something that has been overcharged, and this time was no exception.
I called out nicely to get the ladies attention after waiting for a few minutes for her to notice me, and finally she wandered over. 

"I think I've been overcharged for these 2 items. My reciept shows $4.99, but if you look at the photo, the specials ticket says $3.96" (Yes, I am that customer, I take photo's as I shop but in my defence I was taking shots for an upcoming blog post).

She stared at me blankly for a few seconds, waiting for me to get to the point. "Do you think you could process the refund?"

"I'll have to get someone to check the shelf first" she told me with a sign, again pausing to stare at me blankly, not taking any action. I nodded, happy to wait while they double checked. Keep in mind, I am a real sweety when it comes to customer service interactions. These people do not get paid enough for the crap some customers dish out, so I always want to be the customer they are happy to serve. Apparently it didn't matter how sweet my smile was, this lady was not going to be happy. We waited in a stale mate, before she finally sighed and asked another staff member to act as the runner.

She paused at the back of the Customer Service counter, talking quietly with another staff member and glancing over occassionly, making me feel as though my tediousness was the topic of conversation.

Finally the girl came back, with the shelf tag in hand. My lovely service lady smirked. "It says only the pink one on the ticket". 

Well, as it was the only ticket beneath all of the colours, I assume it means all of them. But yes, I bought a pink as well as a purple. 

"Well, I only have to refund you for the pink. If you can't find an advertised price that says purple, you can't ask for a refund"

Again I showed her my photo, pointing out that it was the only price tag and that all the colours had been grouped together on the shelf, no doubt because customers who can think for themselves would take the Brands pricetag as covering all the varients.

Finally she sighed again, and asked me to find the 2 small pots of hair chalk in amongst my shopping. 5 minutes later my shopping was all over the floor while she stood, stonefaced watching.

$2.06. I was doing this for $2.06 in refunds.

"I need the credit card you used to pay for them". Well, that could be a problem because I used a giftcard to pay. I offered it to her, and she glared. I mean it. She glared. "You used a giftcard? I can't refund to a giftcard". Again, long, awkward silence. Was I expected to come up with a solution?

"OK." That's about all I could come up with. I mean, yes, I was doing all this for $2.06 in refunds, but she was putting me through all this to AVOID $2.06 in refunds. How ridiculous!

Again the sigh. She must take lessons from my 13 year old. "I'll have to give you a refund card." 

"OK" Get on with it. Honestly, my sweet smile was fading. Did she think that making me feel like this was the hardest thing in the world was going to change my mind? This was more tedious than trying to get my 13 year old to tell me about her school day. 

Finally she handed me a refund card with a $12.90 credit. What? I pointed out that the difference for the 2 pots was only $2.06, and she huffed and checked my reciept again, telling me indignantly that the refund was for $9.99 each. We looked at each other in confusion for a few seconds, before she finally sighed again and told me to keep it. I didn't bother to point out that what she told me makes no sense (cents!) at all.

Awkward much? I am up $12.90 for the interaction, with x2 free pots of hair chalk, but disgruntled. Normally the service counter houses the cream of the crop, people who know the value of a $1 refund to a customers perception of the company they serve. Not adults in teenagers skin.

Friday, April 4, 2014

The Easter Raffle Gouge

Source
Are you finding the school Easter Raffle a huge money suck right now? Or is that just me?

We've donated eggs to dancing and now also preschool, and I also have the obligatory raffle tickets to buysell. As a tight arse who still likes decent chocolate, the sum total of the 3 donations to different places (1 per kid) is $9, and I avert my eyes from the raised eyebrows that suggest that I stinged out on my donation.

Those donations get bundled up into as many combinations as can be justified and all look lovely wrapped in cellophane in baskets with ribbons. I know my kids salivate over them every chance they get and beg me to buy tickets. Which I will, because raffle tickets is one thing I never get around to on passing to other relatives. Madeleine has x3 books (that was optimistic) and the toddlers each have 1. If I buy just one book per kid, that is still $30 worth of raffle tickets.

The irony of spending $40 on these Easter Raffles is that I will probably get lucky and win something. I usually do. And it's almost always the bundle with generic brand chocolate (this is one space I do not cheap out on, it has to be the real thing), with possibly my donation included. It's never worth $40.

This is where I say, Do as I say, and not as I do. My tips for surviving the Easter Raffle Gouge
  • Your donation does not have to be big or expensive. Many people giving a little each results in lots of donations
  • Sell those tickets to everyone else you come across. Most people will buy one ticket if your child asks sweetly, and then you share the cost of that book of tickets!
  • Consider buying regular chocolates instead of Easter Eggs which have a lower unit price. Even the major chocolate companies test to bundle up an Easter Egg along with some smaller regular bars in their gift boxes
  • Donate a washing or utility basket instead of chocolate. A washing basket can be just $3 and looks more impressive than a little egg.
  • Donate your time to making up the prizes instead of trying to donate lots of chocolate. Your time comes free!
  • Approach craft centres and stores that run workshops or sessions and ask if they would donate ribbon remnants that are going in the bin
  • Approach locate confectionery stores and ask for donations for your community group in exchange for a prize displaying their business card or logo
  • Also approach online and local boutiques that may sell alternative Easter Gifts and ask for a donation in exchange for some promotion of their product. Lots of people are looking for non-chocolate gifts for their kids
It's possible to survive the Easter Gouge. But not if you take the lazy way out as I have this year.